Glass Ceiling Discrimination

The term “Glass Ceiling” was first discovered by the Wall Street Journal in March 1986. The Oxford Dictionary defines it as an unofficially acknowledged barrier to advancement in a profession, especially affecting women and members of minorities. Basically, the glass ceiling is a visible barrier that prevents women from getting promotions or going into a higher position at work. This barrier cannot be seen but could be felt when a person reaches at that point of a career. Hundreds of women and minorities that have the capability and experience are continuously being rejected from the management opportunities. It is very frustrating for these people because they could perceive themselves going closer to their career goal, but they aren’t able to reach it because of the glass ceiling discrimination.

There are number of reasons to why the glass ceiling exists. It can be the assumption that women are more family-oriented than men, therefore, it’s difficult to maintain both family and work at the same time. However, many women are more career oriented and eager to take the responsibility. Also, in the business world, women are often taken lightly and not considered to be the policy makers by the business men. In order to identify these barriers, Congress had formed the Glass Ceiling Commission in 1991 which studied the concept of “glass ceiling.”

The result was shocking, they found that the women and the minority groups were discriminated against by Whites and men. They were stereotyped as weak and therefore, women and minorities were deprived of the rights and opportunities to move ahead in their career. The glass ceiling still exists today in many work places, but there are lots of women that runs for offices and takes the leadership positions. This depicts that it’s not impossible to break through the “glass ceiling” for women and minorities to reach their high potential and eventually fulfill their career goal.

Reference List:

1. http://www.economist.com/node/4197626
2. http://www.units.miamioh.edu/psybersite/workplace/adobelink.shtml